2019 Abstract submission

Abstracts to the 2019 MASTS Annual Science Meeting should be submitted before 16:00 on Friday 16th August 2019 to masts@st-andrews.ac.uk using the abstract template document

Abstracts can be submitted to one of the following areas:

  1. General Science Session
  2. Technologies & Methods in Marine Science
  3. Multiple stressors
  4. Marine Biogeochemistry
  5. The future of Scottish fisheries in a changing world
  6. Deep Sea

Abstracts can be submitted for talks and/or e-posters.

General Science Sessions

These sessions are composed of 15 minute presentations (12 minute talk plus 3 for questions) in any area of marine science (so anything from socio-economics, fisheries, technology, marine mammals, biodiversity, aquaculture, PMFs, human impacts, marine stressors, MPAs, bacteria, carbon, MSP, algae etc.). Presentations should be tailored to a scientific but non-specialist audience and are an excellent way of promoting your science and the possibilities to collaborate.

 

Technologies & Methods in Marine Science - Championed by the MASTS Technology, Platforms & Sensors Forum

Abstracts are invited for 15 minutes presentations (12 minutes talk with 3 minutes for questions). Papers can be offered in any field of study related to technologies and methodologies applied within the marine environment, including, but not exclusively, sensor development, new platforms or new uses of existing platform or sensors, artificial intelligence or machine learning, new methodologies or data analyses  etc. Presenters are encouraged to not solely focus on past and current research but reflect on gaps of knowledge and future research directions. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.

 

Multiple Stressors - Championed by the MASTS Marine Stressors Forum

Abstracts are invited for 20 minute presentations (15 minute talk with 5 minutes for questions) . Papers can be offered in any field of study applied to multiple stressors research, including, but not exclusively, ecotoxicology, noise, temperature and ocean acidification etc. Presenters are encouraged to not solely focus on past and current research but reflect on gaps of knowledge and future research directions. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.

 

Marine Biogeochemistry - Championed by the MASTS Marine Biogeochemistry Forum

Abstracts are invited for 15 minute presentations (12 minute talk with 3 minutes for questions). Papers are welcomed from any field of Marine Biogeochemistry research. Presenters are encouraged to not solely focus on past and current research but reflect on gaps of knowledge and future research directions. Talks should be accessible to other disciplines by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.

 

The future of Scottish fisheries in a changing world - Championed by the MASTS Fisheries Science Forum

Scotland’s fisheries are changing.  In the short term, they could be about to experience significant political changes; in the medium term, ecological changes are likely; and in the long term, environmental change is certain.  These are the result, respectively, of: Brexit; improvements in fisheries management; and climate change.  In this theme session we welcome contributions which consider the effect of these changes on the management of fisheries and the marine ecosystems of Scotland.  Topics could include, but are not restricted to, fisheries management, fisheries biology and ecology, marine ecosystem dynamics, climate change, and fisheries socio-economics.

 

Deep Sea - Championed by MASTS Deep Sea Forum

Abstracts are invited for 20 minute presentations (15 minute talk with 5 minutes for questions). Papers are welcomed from a wide range of disciplines, including, but not limited to, geology, geochemistry, environmental science, geomorphology, engineering, biology, modelling and conservation. There is a vast amount of work being undertaken by Scottish scientists, engineers and policy makers, including projects such as ATLAS (www.eu-atlas.org), Arctic PRIZE (www.changing-arctic-ocean.ac.uk/project/arctic-prize/) and the Five Deeps (www.fivedeeps.com). Presenters are encouraged to not solely focus on past and current research but to also reflect upon knowledge gaps and future directions. Talks should be accessible to other disciplines by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.