2018 Abstract submission

 

Abstracts to the 2018 MASTS Annual Science Meeting should be submitted before 16:00 on Friday 27th July 2018 to masts@st-andrews.ac.uk using the abstract template document

Abstracts can be submitted to one of the following areas:

  1. General Science Session
  2. Multiple stressors
  3. Microplastics and marine litter
  4. Increasing resilience to natural hazards
  5. The changing Arctic Ocean: identifying and quantifying the Arctic response to climate change
  6. Understanding the Influence of Man-made structures in the Ecosystem - progressing the science

Abstracts can be submitted for talks and/or e-posters.

General Science Sessions

These sessions are composed of 15 minute presentations (12 minute talk plus 3 for questions) in any area of marine science (so anything from socio-economics, fisheries, technology, marine mammals, biodiversity, aquaculture, PMFs, human impacts, marine stressors, MPAs, bacteria, carbon, MSP, algae etc.). Presentations should be tailored to a scientific but non-specialist audience and are an excellent way of promoting your science and the possibilities to collaborate.

Multiple Stressors - Championed by the MASTS Marine Stressors Forum

Abstracts are invited for 15 minute presentations (10 minute talk with 5 minutes for questions) . Papers can be offered in any field of study applied to Multiple Stressors research, including, but not exclusively, chemical, mechanical or noise pollution, and climate change etc. Presenters are encouraged to not solely focus on past and current research but reflect on gaps of knowledge and future research directions. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.

The last part of the session will be dedicated to discussions on the opportunities and challenges associated with marine stressors.

Microplastics & Marine Litter - Championed by Winnie Courtene-Jones

Abstracts are invited for 15 minute presentations (12 minute talk plus 3 for questions). Papers can be offered in any field of study applied to microplastics and marine litter research, including monitoring, transport and fate & ecotoxicology etc. Presenters are requested to ensure that their talks do not solely focus on past and current research but to speculate on future directions of research lead by the UK. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.

The last part of the session will be dedicated to discussions on the future drection of research related to microplastics and marine litter.

Increasing resilience to natural hazards - Championed by Dr Roger Wang

Abstracts are invited for a special session on "Increasing Resilience to Natural Hazards" in the upcoming MASTS Annual Science Meeting. Natural hazards, including floods, hurricanes, coastal erosion, earthquake, sea-level rise, and other extreme natural events, are threatening our daily life and economy. This special session will be a wonderful venue to exchange frontier research in this field. Each talk will be a 15-minute presentation (12 mins presentation + 3 min Q&A). Presenters are requested to ensure that their talks do not solely focus on past and current research but speculate on future directions of research led by the UK. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.

The changing Arctic Ocean: Identifying and quantifying the Arctic response to climate change - Championed by Drs Robyn Tuerena & Katharina Lefering

The Arctic is the fastest changing environment on the planet, supporting diverse albeit poorly understood ecosystems. Changes in the ocean and sea-ice environment of the Arctic will generate major but, as yet, unknown responses in Arctic ecosystems. These are affecting biological processes at every level of organisation – from genetics and physiology to food webs, biogeochemical cycles, species distribution and whole ecosystems. The Arctic is also intrinsically tied to global processes, whether they are climatic, environmental or socio-economic. Consequently, the Arctic is responding in unknown ways to profound changes in the physical environment as well as to multiple natural and anthropogenic events that place stress on Arctic ecosystems. This session solicits submissions highlighting new findings about the response to climate-driven changes of the large-scale ecosystem structure and biogeochemical functioning of the Arctic Ocean. We invite contributions for presentations of 12 minutes duration that focus on the impacts of retreating and thinning sea ice, open water areas of larger and longer duration, riverine runoff and associated nutrient and pollutant loads, changes in Arctic Ocean circulation, and alteration of gas exchange across the atmosphere/surface ocean boundary. Abstracts spanning topics ranging from observational data and modelling outputs on primary productivity, species distributions, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem services and food webs are strongly encouraged. Presenters are requested to ensure that their talks do not solely focus on past and current research but speculate on future directions of research lead by the UK. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.

Understanding the Influence of Man-made Structures in the Ecosystem - Championed by Richard Heard (INSITE)

Abstracts are invited for 15 minute presentation slots (12 minute talks + 3 minutes for questions). Papers can be offered in any field of study within the context of offshore man-made structures and the impact their presence or removal at decommissioning may have on ecosystems, including, but not exclusively, connectivity, modelling, temporal and spatial interactions, decision-making, species/community interactions, and ecosystem function etc. Presenters are encouraged to not solely focus on past and current research but reflect on gaps of knowledge and future research directions. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.