2017 Abstract submission

Abstracts to the 2017 MASTS Annual Science Meeting should be submitted before 16:00 on Friday 7th July 2017 to masts@st-andrews.ac.uk using the abstract template document

Abstracts can be submitted to one of the following areas:

  1. General Science Session
  2. Maximising capabilities of volunteer observing systems
  3. SNH session - Safeguarding Scotland’s coasts and seas…. perspectives and visions
  4. Deep Sea
  5. Circulation, dispersion and connectivity in Scottish Waters
  6. Marine Biogeochemistry

Abstracts can be submitted for talks and/or e-posters.

General Science Sessions

These sessions are composed of 15 minute presentations (12 plus 3 for questions) in any area of marine science (so anything from socio-economics, fisheries, technology, marine mammals, biodiversity, aquaculture, PMFs, human impacts, marine stressors, MPAs, bacteria, carbon, MSP, algae etc.). Presentations should be taylored to a scientific but non-specialist audience and are an excellent way of promoting your science and the possiblities to collaborate.

Maximising capabilities of volunteer observing systems - Championed by SAHFOS 

Recommendations from the recent G7 Science and Technology Minister’s meeting held in Japan (May 2016) called for the development of a global initiative for an enhanced, sustained sea and ocean observing system, supporting both critical ongoing observations and the integration of sensor technologies and new observations. Specifically, the G7 Science Ministers highlighted the need to support routine implementation of ecosystem/biodiversity Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) and foster increased collaboration with the shipping industry. Taking a holistic approach, this special session will explore the opportunities available to maximise monitoring capabilities of volunteer observing systems, with invited representatives from the political, shipping, scientific and industry communities. The session will provide an insight into the political drivers behind this call, the scientific opportunities available with technology and instrumentation, the requirement from end-users (industry) of appropriate, relevant data and the possible means by which all this can be enabled through the shipping industry.

Abstracts are invited for 15 minute presentations (12 minute talk with 3 minutes for questions) to contribute to this session. Presenters are requested to ensure that their talks do not solely focus on past and current research but speculate on future directions of research lead by the UK. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.

The last part of the session will be dedicated to discussions on the opportunities and challenges associated with developing volunteer observing systems in the marine environment.

Safeguarding Scotland’s coasts and seas…. perspectives and visions - Championed by SNH to celebrate their 25th Anniversary

To mark SNH’s 25th Anniversary, this special session invites perspectives on research and science which has supported the development of Scottish marine and coastal nature conservation over the last quarter century and visions on what lies ahead. Abstracts are invited for 15 minute presentations (includes time for questions). Papers can be offered in any field of study applied to marine and coastal nature conservation in Scotland, including monitoring; marine protected areas; and marine planning & integrated coastal zone management. Presenters are requested to ensure that their talks do not solely focus on past and current research but speculate on future directions of research. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple. The last part of the session will be dedicated to discussion on the future direction of nature conservation for Scotland’s coasts and seas.

Deep Sea - Championed by Dr Bhavani Narayanaswamy 

Abstracts are invited for 15 minute presentations (includes time for questions). Papers can be offered in any field of study applied to deep water research, including ecology, physics, chemistry, geology, marine protected areas etc. Presenters are requested to ensure that their talks do not solely focus on past and current research but speculate on future directions of deep-water research lead by the UK. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple. We would particularly like to encourage those who have been recipients of Deep-Sea Forum small grants to submit an abstract and students. The last part of the session will be dedicated to discussions around the future priorities of deep-water research.

Circulation, dispersion and connectivity in Scottish Waters - Championed by Dr David Woolf 

Abstracts are invited for 15 minute presentations (includes time for questions). Papers may address any aspect of circulation, dispersion and connectivity in Scottish Waters, but cross-disciplinary aspects are particularly encouraged. Approaches may draw on any scientific discipline (e.g. ecology, genetics, physics or chemistry) and may apply to any maritime sector (e.g. shipping, aquaculture or conservation). Presenters are requested to ensure that their talks do not solely focus on past and current research but speculate on future directions of research led by the UK. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple. The last part of the session will be dedicated to discussions around the future priorities for circulation, dispersion and connectivity research in Scottish Waters.

Marine Biogeochemistry - Championed by Dr Nick Kamenos 

Abstracts are invited for 12 minute presentation slots (10 minute talks + 2 minutes for questions). Papers can be offered in any field within the context of marine biogeochemistry research, based on studies performed in the field, aquaria or mesocosms, and from historical or remote sensing records. We encourage studies that provide insight into the spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemistry in marine ecosystems in the past and present-day, and how these dynamics may be impacted by projected climate change. Studies with a focus on community-level assemblages, or those that focus on the effects of multiple stressors (e.g. temperature, ocean acidification, but also direct and local anthropogenic influences such as nutrient enrichment, pollution) to better reproduce the real world are particularly welcome. Presenters are requested to ensure that their talks do not solely focus on past and current research but speculate on the future direction of marine biogeochemistry research lead by the UK. Talks will need to be accessible to other disciplines, by avoiding jargon and keeping technical details simple.